Author: Deb Christiansen

Home Town Takeover

Schoolcraft, MI

Schoolcraft, MI is located half-way between Chicago and Detroit. Named after Henry Schoolcraft who was noted for his studies of early Native Americans. US 131 runs through the main part of town, which tends to be a blessing and a curse. Population is just over 1500.

The neighboring town of Vicksburg (pop. 2,906) is in the process of overhauling the old paper mill to turn it into destination venue with multiple breweries, marketplaces, and event center. Schoolcraft on US131 will be the gateway to this grand destination with no bar.

Our beloved Bud’s Bar, around since 1972, closed last year. It was housed in a building that is almost 150 years old. The building was originally three stories and at one time boasted a second story outhouse. Downtown is a mix of old and new. Most of the historic buildings have been maintained and have businesses such as antique shops, beauty salons, craft store, insurance agencies, lawyer, realtor, etc. Eateries include the diner Marjos and Nonla Taqueria. Neither of which serve alcohol. We also have a McDonald’s, Wendy’s, Pizza Hut, Subway, Little Caesars, and Biggy Coffee.

Schoolcraft is proud to have the Underground Railroad House. Built in 1835 by Dr. Nathan Thomas, this small house saw an estimated 1,500 fugitives go through its doors and onto Canada over a twenty year period. Dr. Nathan Thomas was Kalamazoo County’s first doctor. The Underground Railroad House has been maintain by a dedicated Historical Society.

The ladies of Schoolcraft formed a library club in 1879, and this club is still in existence. The women pioneers raised money in the late 1890’s to get their own building, and accomplished that. The Ladies Library Building was dedicated in 1898. This building is still on Hayward Street by the Post Office, and the Ladies Library holds their meetings there. Anyone can join and dues is only $10/year. In July, our Capital Historian will speak there on Women’s Suffrage. This library was the lending library in town until…

In 1988, the townspeople in the true Schoolcraft pioneer spirit raised money to build a new library. This is a modern, vibrant place with weekly children’s programs and dedicated volunteers.

The home in the video was built in 1832 by Kalamazoo County’s first lawyer. He passed away leaving a widow with two daughters. She married a successful businessman with seven daughters and a son. He thought each child should have their own room, so remodeled the house to make that happen. The current owners very proudly maintain this home that looks out on Schoolcraft’s Burch Park.

Every year Schoolcraft has a Fourth of July parade through town to honor our past and celebrate our future. It draws upwards of 5,000 people to the small town. Other Schoolcraft events include historical home tours, tours of the Underground Railroad House, the yearly Christmas Walk, and the Hauntingly Historic Schoolcraft cemetery tour.

History. It’s Alive in the charming town of Schoolcraft. It would just like a drink.

Art Hop

art_hop

Art Hop is a free-of-charge, fun-filled evening of art exhibits and events in and around Kalamazoo. It takes place the first Friday of every month.


Art Hop in Schoolcraft May 1st

Deb Christiansen will be coordinating the Art Hop in Schoolcraft. If you are a business or artist that would like to participate, please contact her here. Deadline is February 29, 2020.


From the ACGK website:

Artist Interested in Participating

Are you a visual artist, musician, poet or actor interested in showcasing your talent in Art Hop?  Art Hop is held the first Friday of every month in downtown Kalamazoo and is a celebration of the arts community.  We invite you to become a part of one of Kalamazoo’s signature events!

Participating venues are encouraged to find artists through the directory listing of the Arts Council’s member artists here on kalamazooarts.org. To become a member and add your profile into the mix, please visit our membership page and sign up.

To be considered for a show in one of the Arts Council curated galleries, we ask that you submit the below information to arthop@kalamazooarts.org with a recommended subject line of “Request to Exhibit”.

  • Artist Contact Information
  • Artist Statement/Bio/Website
  • Work Samples (3 – 5) with Titles and Descriptions
  • For visual artists, include your artwork dimensions and any special requirements for exhibit.
  • For non-visual groups, include the number of members in your group and any special requirements for performance.

Click here for a great video tutorial on photographing your 2D artwork, and click here for video tutorials on editing your photos on various programs.

If you are an artist with plans to participate at a venue for an Art Hop, please provide your venue with the required information found below in the venue section.  All participation information must come from the venue and information submitted by an artist will not be accepted.


Venue Interested in Participating

  1. To participate in Art Hop please fill out this submission form:  Art Hop Business Submission HERE!
  2. If you have any questions regarding Art Hop in general, the dates, the forms or need an artist, please contact Charlie Tomlinson at arthop@kalamazooarts.org
  3. If you are an artist looking to participate in Art Hop please contact us at arthop@kalamazooarts.org

Deadlines

The deadline for submitting Art Hop information through the JotForm link (above) is the the Monday after the previous month’s Art Hop. Example January 7 for February, February 4 for March etc.

Cost to participate

Participation is $50 per site/artist per participation. Payment is the responsibility of the business or host site. The business may elect to pass all or a portion of the cost onto the artist, but payment must come from the business. Click here to be redirected to our Art Hop payment page.

Finding an Artist

If you’re a venue looking to find an artist to host in your space for an upcoming Art Hop, we encourage to browse our online Artist Directory.  For a visual walkthrough guide on accessing this directory, click here.


Proofs

The Arts Council will send out a proof of the Art Hop brochure electronically. The deadline for changes or corrections will be included in the email. This is a strict deadline. Changes or corrections submitted after that date will not be made.

The following Art Hop Fridays in 2020 are looking for YOU!

January – No Art Hop May 1 September 4
February 7 June 5 October 2
March 6 July 10 November 6
April 3 August 7 December 4

The Big Fire of 1893

The Big FireThere has been mention of the big fire that happened in Schoolcraft in 1893 (the Great fire happened in 1879) taking out several buildings south of what is currently the Loving Ewe. It burned with such intensity that it blew out windows across the street, and yet, miraculously did not harm the fan-shaped window that still exists. Here is the article from the Schoolcraft Express dated December 8, 1893. Ironically, this did not make the front page of the Schoolcraft Express and ran on page 4. Paragraphs created for ease of reading and were not provided in the original article.

AMONG THE RUINS!

OUR VILLAGE VISITED BY A SEVERE FIRE.

ASSEMBLYY (sic) HALL WITH THREE OTHER BUILDINGS COMPLETELY WIPED OUT.

The Total Loss Reaches About $6,000, Partially Covered by Insurance–E.L. Brown and A. L. Campbell the Heaviest Losers–Explosion of a Kerosene Stove Supposed to Have Caused the Fire–Good Work Done by the Fire Fighters in Checking the Progress of the Flames–Other Incidents of the Big Fire.

The most destructive fire that has visited our village since the great fire of 1879, when it will be remembered five of the main business places on the west side of Grand street, just south of the late fire were wiped out, broke out in Assembly hall building shortly before four o’clock Monday afternoon. The entire lower floor of this building was occupied by the grocery store of A. L. Campbell, while the upper floor was used as a public hall.

The fire is supposed to have started in the basement of the building by the explosion of a kerosene heating stove, which had been placed there to keep the potatoes from freezing. When discovered, the fire had gained such headway as to make it impossible to enter the basement and a very few moments later the whole building was one mass of flames. Owing to a failure to get the fire engine in working order and a lack of water in the cistern at the corner of Grand and Cass streets, made it impossible to do much toward stopping the fire with the engine and soon the flames spread to adjoining buildings on the north, consuming the one story wooden building of Lewis P. Bell and occupied by Henry I. Allen, Justice H. P. Smith and the National Express Company’s office.

Just north of Assembly hall and west of the Bell building stood an ice house, owned by Mr. Bell, which was also consumed. Almost at the same time that the buildings on the north caught fire, the flames spread to the barn of Chas. Underwood, on Hayward street, only a few rods west, and which was also burned to the ground. At this stage of the fire, with four buildings in flames, it looked as though other buildings on the north would be doomed to the fate of the raging flames, but by hard and persistent fighting the brick store of W. W. McLeod on the south, and the meat market building of Lewis P. Bell on the north and the residence of Chas. Underwood were all saved, although it looked at one time as if it would be almost an impossibility to save the two latter.

The fire engine did good service in saving Mr. Underwood’s house for without its use the building would surely have been destroyed. All through the fire, which lasted about two hours, the fire fighters fought bravely and unceasingly, and their efforts were rewarded by saving thousands of dollars worth of property which at one time it looked as though it would be an utter impossibility to save from being wiped up by the fierce flames.

The stock in the harness shop of A. D. Chapin was all moved from the building, the meat market fixtures and stock of W. R. Arthur in the Bell building were moved into the street, and all of the household goods of Will Smith, who occupied the Cooper house on Hayward street were removed. The wind was blowing from the southwest and for a time matters began to look serious for the east side of the street, the restaurant building of Aaron Burson being somewhat scorched, but by good work was kept from taking fire.

THE LOSSES

Assembly hall building, which was owned by E. L. Brown and valued at about $3,000 was insured in the Hartford Insurance Company of which Henry P. Smith is local agent, for $1,600. A. L. Campbell’s stock of groceries and fixtures were valued at about $2,000, and on which he carried but $800 insurance in the Fireman’s Fund, E. W. Bowman, local agent. A portion of Mr. Cambell’s stock was saved and are now in the Troxel building across the street. L. P. Bell’s loss on the frame building and ice house $500, not insured. Mr. Bell’s brick building occupied by W. R. Arthur as a meat market was somewhat damaged by heat; his loss on this building is covered by insurance in the Aetna, H. I. Allen, local agent. The stock goods of W. R. Arthur and A. D. Chapin were damaged considerable by being removed; the latter’s loss is covered by insurance in the Aetna company. Chas. Underwood’s loss on barn and contents, $200, not insured. On house and contents he carried an insurance in the Phoenix which is represented by Abram Gardner as local agent. Mr. Underwoord’s household goods were all removed, and somewhat damaged on which he will receive insurance. W. W. McLeod’s brick store on the south was somewhat damaged by the heat, fully covered by insurance. Nearly all the windows in buildings on the opposite side of the street from the fire, were broken by the intense heat. Mr. Troxel’s loss in this direction is covered by insurance. Other slight losses are reported, the American Express Company losing a few packages.

Schoolcraft Tour

Introduction

Nana D’s Attic

Biggby Coffee

At the Dome A Night of Miracles

Song Jingle Bells

The story of Schoolcraft begins in 1828 when Bazel Harrison moved his family from Ohio and settled in “Prairie Ronde,” (French for “round meadow”) becoming the first settler in the future Kalamazoo County. He was followed by Thaddeus Smith in 1829 who spoke of Prairie Ronde in glowing terms, and said it was the “garden of the world.”
The village itself was laid out in 1831 by surveyor Lucius Lyon, who had first visited the area as a surveyor under government contract in 1823. On October 5, 1831, the village was declared the first town in Kalamazoo County. The name – Schoolcraft, Lucius Lyon’s friend and the man instrumental in shaping the Michigan Territory.
First Doctor in Kalamazoo County and possibly the first lawyer.

American Legion

Mr. and Mrs. Claus

United Methodist Church

Away in a Manger

The Methodist Episcopal Church was the second church to be built in Schoolcraft and has been here since 1852. Prior to this time services were held in a building afterwards used for barn.

In 1879, the church was refitted and re-furnished at a cost of $1400, and in 1883 the chapel and horse sheds were built at a cost of $1000.

Mike’s Barber Shop

Across the street, in 1881 there used to be a Wagon & Carriage Factory and General Black Smithing by Phillips and McCleod.

Salon Harlow

In 1881 This is where the Meat Market was that was owned by G.C. Fanckboner.

Hark, the Herald Angels Sing

The Beauty Bar

Craft and Grand

Here Comes Santa Claus

The Troxel House

The first hotel to stand on this site was the Beals Hotel built in 1841 when the business district began moving from Center Street to Grand. It was famous for the dance floor in its ballroom. The Beals Hotel was wiped out by fire. The Troxel House was three stories and boasted a second floor outhouse. The lobby and office were once rented to a bank, a store, a bar, and a post office. 1881 The bank was owned by E.B. Dyckman and his house still stands in Schoolcraft on Clay street 1832 one of the oldest in Kalamazoo County. The store sold Boots & Shoes. Another store sold groceries, crockery and glassware. The Schoolcraft Dispatch & News, which was Schoolcraft’s early newspaper. The Dispatch would be replaced by the Schoolcraft Express. The Troxel house would later become the Commercial House.

Barber and Hairdresser, John Pabst

Ad in Schoolcraft Express 1892: John Pabst, Fashionable Barber and Hair Dresser, Schoolcraft Mich. Hair cut, clipped and trimmed, Shampooning, dying, etc. neatly done. Give me a call.

Barber and Hairdresser, F.L. Strong 1881

Drugstore–Stuart & Sawyer 1881

Speculation. 1893 Secret Societies–Schoolcraft Lodge Number 118 meets every Mondy evening on or before full moon at their hall over Briggs Bros’ drug store.

Presbyterian Church

Joy to the World

1920 A Congregational church was organized in 1844 in Schoolcraft. There were ten members. They held their meetings in the schoolhouse at first, and afterwards in the ballroom of the Old Barracks Hotel until it was burned.

The present building was dedicated on August 28, 1892, this new church was dedicated.

On South East corner of Grand and Eliza was a WindMill Factory

LMCU

This area used to have the Chapin mansion owned by Dr. John Chapin and built around 1879. It was torn down in about 2013. For many years it was home to Oak Creations. My dining room table is from Oak Creations. There’s an ad in the Schoolcraft Express 1892: J.F. Chapin, M.D. Physician and Surgeon, Schoolcraft, Mich. Office at residence, sw corner of Grand and Eliza Streets. Office hours from 8 to 10 am and Saturdays from 1 to 5 pm.

The Christmas Song

Schoolcraft Express

John Robertson owned the Dispatch, Schoolcraft’s Newspaper and ran it from the Commercial House Block as it was called. In 1880 John Budrow purchased the paper. The subscription price was $1.50/year. In 1883 the name of the paper was changed to The Schoolcraft Express. In 1886, the paper expanded and was “Devoted to the Interests of Schoolcraft and Vicinity.”

For over hundred years Schoolcraft had its own weekly newspaper called The Schoolcraft Express. It started in 1866 and ran until the 1970’s when Sue Moore’s family purchased The Schoolcraft Express from Chandler and Barbara Garrison. They combined the name and called it the Vicksburg Commercial-Express. The Kalamazoo Gazette purchased the paper in 2000, and continued to publish it under the name, South County Commercial-Express until they closed it in 2011. In 2012, Sue Moore and a dedicated group of volunteers started publishing monthly The South County News so once again we have a paper “Devoted to the Interests of Schoolcraft and Vicinity.”

On account of the absence of the director, the next meeting of the Ladies’ Library Club has been adjourned one week, so all members please take notice, that the meeting will be May 2, at 3:45 pm. For bargains in shoes go to Hewitt’s as he is closing out several good lines of odds and ends at half price.1893

1893 Will Schoolcraft have a street sprinkler the coming season, is a question that is frequently asked, but the Express is sorry to say that no move in this direction has as yet been made. We would, like many others, be pleased to see such an enterprise started. The prospects for Schoolcraft making a rapid advancement in the coming year were never more encouraging than at this time, and everything possible should be done to make our village attractive to visitors. Let everyone do something in the way of improving our streets, residences and business places. Don’t let the other fellow do it all, but each one lend assistance.

Gun Shop owned by F.O.Jannash

Groceries & Restaurant, Thomas Griffith

Merchant Tailor, William Boyne

Jewelry & Picture Frames, E. Gale

General Store, William Cooper

Schoolcraft Antique Mall

KCSB

Holly Jolly Christmas

Since 1908.
Founded in 1908, Kalamazoo County State Bank is the oldest independently owned and operated community bank in Kalamazoo County. The driving force that led to the bank’s formation over ten decades ago came from the Krum and Angell families. Members of both families saw the need for hometown banking services for Schoolcraft and its surrounding communities.

Grand Antique Gallery, LLC

Schoolcraft Opera House.

Angels We Have Heard on High

Loving Ewe

This shop is said to be the oldest mercantile building on the main street. It was originally Isaac Allen’s Hardware Store in the 1840’s. By 1881, it may have been owned by E.G. Stillwell & Co. It survived the fire of 1893 which completely destroyed four stores directly to the south. The heat was so intense that windows across the street were broken, yet the small fan window below the cornice peak wasn’t even cracked.
December 1893 The fire broke out in Assembly hall building shortly before four o’clock in the afternoon.

The fire is supposed to have started in the basement of the building by the explosion of a kerosene heating stove, which has been placed there to keep the potatoes from freezing.

Owing to a failure to get the fire engine in working order and a lack of water in the cistern at the corner of Grand and Cass street, made it impossible to do much toward stopping the fire with the engine and soon with flames spread to adjoining buildings. Gone were the Assembly Hall owned by E.L.Brown, one of our founding fathers. A one story building owned by Lewis Bell and his ice house. A barn owned by Chas Underwood. Saved were the brick store of W.W. McLeod on the south and the meat market building of Lewis Bell on the north.

Ladies Library

It was a book agent who was responsible for the organization of the Ladies’ Library Association in this village, one of the oldest and most enthusiastic organizations of the kind in the state. 1920. The book agent was here in 1879 and so earnestly did he talk of the value of reading, in his effort to sell books, that a club was formed by eighteen ladies of the village. From this grew the present association.
In the early days, the women met in each others homes.

In 1895 it was felt that more room was required and the ladies with the help of other villagers helped raise the money for a building of their own. The building was dedicated in 1896.

Silent Night

Nonla Taqueria

The Twelve Days of Christmas

We Wish You A Merry Christmas

Dr. J. M. Waldron, Physician and Surgeon

Schoolcraft, MI. Office in the Bauer building, opposite Merrill Hall. Night calls will be answered from the Office.

Mrs. Grace Clark

1920 Hat Sale–I have about four dozen hats on hand which must go regardless of price. Now is your time to get the very best millinery at a low price.
XMAS WEATHER has come at last. Here are suggestions for mother, daughter, sister, and best girl. You can giver her one of those lovely kimonas, or dressing sacques in crepe or fleeced cloth, a silk petticoat, or new tricolette, a silk or crepe de chette waist, plaited skirts, cotton, silk or linen handkerchiefs, endless varieties of ribbon hair bows, wide flowered ribbons for bags or other fancy work, bone hair pins, combs, barretts, beads, bags, or velvet. Come in an see.

Opera House

Schoolcraft Opera House
Bell’s Opera House
Bell’s Hall
Merrill Hall
Comfort Theatre
Idea Theatre

Christmas Walk Carols

Song Jingle Bells

Away in a Manger

Hark, the Herald Angels Sing

Here Comes Santa Claus

Joy to the World

The Christmas Song

Holly Jolly Christmas

Angels We Have Heard on High

Silent Night

The Twelve Days of Christmas

We Wish You A Merry Christmas

The Twelve Days of Christmas

On the first day of Christmas, my true love sent to me

A mynah bird in a papaya tree.
On the second day … Two jars of salsa
On the third day … Three peacocks
On the fourth day … Four flower leis
On the fifth day … Five golden habaneros
On the sixth day … Six straw hats
On the seventh day … Seven coconuts
On the eighth day … Eight tie-dyed t-shirts
On the ninth day … Nine calypso dancers
On the tenth day … Ten reggae singers
On the eleventh day … Eleven juicy mangoes
On the twelveth day … Twelve steel drums playing

Schoolcraft 31st Annual Christmas Walk

Schoolcraft Christmas Walk

Friday, Dec. 6th 6 pm to 9 pm

Village of Schoolcraft

442 N Grand Street
269-679-4304
Lobby will be open during Walk. Restrooms. Maps. Free postcard of the Underground Railroad by Wm Christiansen Photography.
6 pm to 9 pm


Christmas Caroling

Join us to carol the town red. A cappella caroling with historical tour of downtown Schoolcraft. Don your Santa hat and meet at the Village of Schoolcraft. Call Deb for more info. 269-679-5795
7 pm to 8 pm


Nana D’s Attic

13210 U.S. 131
(North of Schoolcraft Village)
269-366-6820
40+ Vendors!
Something for everyone!

6 pm to 9 pm


Biggby Coffee

531 N Grand St A
269-679-7148
Stop in and enjoy Schoolcraft’s favorite coffee and more!

6 am to 8 pm


Grand Antique Gallery, LLC

231 North Grand Street
269-568-3360
Nice selection of antiques, glassware & artwork, a good mix of interesting items. Music by Myles Cooley and live caricatures by Bryce Cooley, come join the fun and festivities.

6 pm to 9 pm


Schoolcraft Ladies Library

Since 1879
163 Hayward Street
FOOD — Enjoy our Craft and Cookie sale, refreshments, and a tour of our Historic Building. Free postcard of Ladies Library building. Elizabeth Hamilton’s latest book, Have Camera, Will Travel in Historic Village of Schoolcraft, Michigan. Book Signing.

6 pm to 9 pm


Kalamazoo County State Bank

Since 1908
223 North Grand Street
269-679-5291
Stop by and guess the amount of money in our “Christmas Present Jar.” There will be donuts and cider to enjoy as well. Celebrate the season with KCSB!

6 pm to 9 pm


Schoolcraft Antique Mall

209 North Grand Street
269-679-5282
Antiques – Lots of freshly picked antiques, thanking all our customers for their patronage. Join us for a festive weekend.

6 pm to 9 pm


American Legion

425 East Clay Street
269-720-4062
Cocktails, beer, and wine. Sloppy Joes & cookie decorating. Mr. & Mrs. Claus.

6 pm to 9 pm


Schoolcraft United Methodist Church

342 North Grand Street
269-598-1749
FOOD — Friday evening, Sloppy Joe & Pie Supper 5 to 7 pm. Bake Sale, White Elephant Sale, Craft Sale, Silent Auction.

5 pm to 8 pm


Salon Harlow

240 North Grand Street 269-679-3030
Holiday Pop Up-Shop Boutique Oz
Shop • Sip • Snack

5 pm to 8 pm


Craft & Grand

222 North Grand Street
269-806-7940
New store! Shop for locally made goods during the Christmas Walk and snack on cookies & cocoa.

6 pm to 9 pm


First Presbyterian Church – DeVries Law Offices

132 North Grand Street
FRIDAY evening at DeVries Law Offices – craft items, baked goods, raffle tickets.

6 pm to 9 pm


Lake Michigan Credit Union

LMCU
106 S. Grand Street
616-242-9790
Warm up with coffee, hot chocolate, and cookies. Pictures w/ Santa. Lazy Man BBQ in parking lot.

6 pm to 9 pm


Saturday, Dec. 7th 9 am to 3 pm

(check individual venues for accurate times)

Village of Schoolcraft

442 N Grand Street
269-679-4304
Lobby will be open during Walk. Restrooms. Maps. Free postcard of the Underground Railroad by Wm Christiansen Photography.
9 am to 3 pm


Christmas Caroling

Join us to carol the town red. A cappella caroling with historical tour of downtown Schoolcraft. Don your Santa hat and meet at the Village of Schoolcraft. Call Deb for more info. 269-679-5795
1 pm to 2 pm


Nana D’s Attic

13210 U.S. 131 (North of Schoolcraft Village)
269-366-6820
40+ Vendors! Something for everyone!

9 am to 6 pm


Biggby Coffee

531 N Grand St A
269-679-7148
Stop in and enjoy Schoolcraft’s favorite coffee and more! SATURDAY 1.99 hot/iced specialty beverages up to 20 oz. Upgrades available.

6 am to 8 pm


Grand Antique Gallery, LLC

231 North Grand Street
269-568-3360
Nice selection of antiques, glassware & artwork, a good mix of interesting items. Music by Myles Cooley and live caricatures by Bryce Cooley, come join the fun and festivities.

11 am to 6 pm


Schoolcraft Antique Mall

209 North Grand Street
269-679-5282
Antiques – Lots of freshly picked antiques, thanking all our customers for their patronage. Join us for a festive weekend.

10 am to 5 pm


Schoolcraft Ladies Library

Since 1879
163 Hayward Street
FOOD — Enjoy our crafts, refreshments, and a tour of our Historic Building. Free postcard of Ladies Library building. Free postcard of Ladies Library building. Elizabeth Hamilton’s latest book, Have Camera, Will Travel in Historic Village of Schoolcraft, Michigan. Book Signing.

10 am to 12 noon


Schoolcraft United Methodist Church

342 North Grand Street
269-598-1749
FOOD — Homemade Soup Luncheon from 11 am to 1 pm. Cookie Walk. Bake Sale, White Elephant Sale, Craft Sale, Silent Auction.

9 am to 2 pm


Craft & Grand

222 North Grand Street
269-806-7940
New store! Shop for locally made goods during the Christmas Walk and snack on cookies & cocoa.

10 am to 12 noon


Reflections Modern Photography at The Beauty Bar

224 North Grand Street
269-762-0238
Professional photos with SANTA. First come, first served. $15/child or group.

11 am to 3 pm


First Presbyterian Church of Schoolcraft, Westminster Hall

224 East Cass Street
FOOD SATURDAY, pasties and Chicken ‘n’ Biscuits, 10 am to 2 pm. Also Clothing Boutiques, Attic Treasures, crafts, bake sale, raffle.

9 am to 3 pm


Lake Michigan Credit Union

LMCU
106 S. Grand Street
616-242-9790
Warm up with coffee, hot chocolate, and cookies. Photo booth. Craft for Kids. Lazy Man BBQ in parking lot.

9 am to 2 pm


Schoolcraft Community Library

330 North Centre Street 269-679-5959
10:30 am – 12:30 pm Book Signing by Joy Avery Melville of her new book, Meant for Her
10:30 – 11:15 am Princesses and Pirates DISNEY Sing-Along. Wear your sparkliest tiara or blackest pirate hat and sing along to Disney’s greatest hits.

10 am to 1 pm


Burch Park

WEATHER PERMITTING–Chubby Goat Acres (with Oprah Goatfrey) will be at Burch Park on Saturday, December 7 from 10 am to 1 pm.

What Do Sites That Have Never Been Penalized by Google Look Like?

User signals! It’s the one thing SEOs don’t optimize for. I don’t know why most SEOs ignore this metric considering how important it is to Google. See, Google doesn’t care to put the website with the most backlinks at the top or the best on page SEO… they want to put the website that you […]

Source: What Do Sites That Have Never Been Penalized by Google Look Like?

User signal #1: Bounce rate
We found that Google loves sites that have a bounce rate between 26% and 69%.
User signal #2: Mobile friendliness
Roughly 60% of all searches take place on a mobile device.
User signal #3: Average load time
Page Speed Insights
User signal #4: Percentage of repeat visitors and subscribersGoogle likes anywhere from 16% to 45% repeat visitors.
User signal #5: Percentage of search traffic from brand queries
User signal #6: Click-through rate
User signal #7: Pageviews per visitor
User signal #8: Average time on site

Posted in SEO

Dr. Nathan Thomas

A play about the Underground Railroad
Underground railroad by B.F. Dorsey. Dorsey, B. F., (Benjamin F.) 1898
https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=aeu.ark:/13960/t50g49h8t;view=1up;seq=1

Nathan M. Thomas helped establish the first anti-slavery newspaper in Michigan and was an active participant on the Underground Railroad. It is estimated that Thomas helped as many as 1,500 escaped slaves obtain freedom in Canada. In 1845, Thomas also unsuccessfully campaigned to become Michigan’s lieutenant governor.

Portrait
http://signalofliberty.aadl.org/signal_hs5229